#babeswhohustle

“In the future, there will be no female leaders. There will just be leaders.” 
― Sheryl Sandberg

Asking For a Friend | Chapter 33

Asking For a Friend | Chapter 33

Advice from Babe to Babe


We got 99 problems but needing advice ain’t one. Per usual, the gurus are here with great advice for all your new job woes.


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The honeymoon phase of a new job can be so exciting, but don’t let it distract you from getting comfortable and confident in your everyday tasks. Keep a running Google Doc of your new ideas, and unless they’re needed or come up naturally, wait until the three- to six-month mark to call a meeting with your boss and discuss what you’ve been brainstorming. I definitely encourage you to keep that excitement going and keep tabs on your creative ideas, but it’s always a good idea to make sure you’re standing on a solid foundation of skill sets, duties and the tasks they hired you to do—before jumping in with changes. Build some trust, cultivate some confidence and knock them out of the park once you’re settled into the team dynamics.

–MARA STROBEL-LANKA, BWH CREATIVE DIRECTOR

There is a right time, but I'm not sure it can easily be determined outside of the moment. Some general things to keep in mind while you wait for that moment: (1) Observe and ask questions. Make sure you know who created the current workflows and why they exist in their current state. (2) Know who the key stakeholders are in making the changes you want to suggest and develop good relationships with them. (3) When the time comes, try not to speak negatively about a workflow (or whatever you want to change) and instead focus on why your idea makes sense. (4) Don't try to change everything immediately and all at once. Your coworkers need to not only buy in, but know the change won't create a ton of new work for them (because their plates are likely full). Earn trust, observe the challenges and opportunities and roadmap it out so it's not so overwhelming for those used to the old ways. (5) Write down all your ideas and thoughts now, so you don't lose any ideas that are coming from your fresh perspective as a new employee.

—ASHLIE JOHNSON COGGINS, CONTRIBUTOR

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A lack of structure sounds ideal, until you jump into a job with no pointers on what to do. If you feel like you’re drowning, call a lifeguard! It’s your manager’s job to direct you and delegate work. Call or email them for a meeting, and ask for a checklist of daily tasks they want you to cover, as well as long- and short-term goals to keep on your radar. If they don’t give you rigid instructions, write your own (and keep it as an ongoing list for the next intern in your position).

–MARA STROBEL-LANKA, BWH CREATIVE DIRECTOR

Someone once (I believe accurately) told me that in marketing, most things have been done before in some way, shape or form. Do some Googling and see what other similar organizations are doing that you could adapt to your organization—maybe with your own fresh twist. Have some examples and a general outline of what you plan to do in case down the line “do whatever you want” turns into, “Why did you do that?!”

–ALEXI STRONG GONZALEZ, CONTRIBUTOR

In any sort of career, you’re going to have jobs with micromanagers, busy work you don’t want to do, etc. I seriously doubt you’ll ever look back at this internship and think, Man, I wish I had had more rules. Take this opportunity to think about what you want for your career within the next few years, and use this opportunity to selfishly cater the role towards that. Make a list (or five) of big projects or small skill sets you want to learn while you’re there, and create your job to fit that. Good luck, and enjoy the freedom!

–EMILY BLOCH, BABE #201

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Babe, if it’s your calling, don’t give up! When it comes to making the big move, there are a few interviewing “tips and tricks” that can help seal the deal. First, delete your address and your job position addresses from your resumes. Some recruiters will see these tiny details and automatically rule you out because you don’t seem worth the “hassle.” Second, nail down the “Why do you want to move here?” question, making sure to mention if you’ve visited before, have somewhere to stay and any local tidbits you might have up your sleeve. Finally, if you can afford to, fly out for a couple days and lock in your days with informational interviews. Someone is way more likely to put their neck out and recommend you if they’ve met you in person. Try combining it with a long weekend so you have fun, local experiences to bring up in your interview (and follow up about after).

—MANDY SHOLD, CONTRIBUTOR + BABE #154

This is definitely not one-size-fits-all advice, but I just went through a really similar situation and this is what worked for me: I desperately wanted to move to my partner’s city for a change in pace and to be closer to all the new friendships I’d forged, but nobody was hiring in my field. Eventually, I took a contract position—no salary, no benefits, but in my field—as a push to have a reason to get there. Within a month, offers flowed in from people, now that they knew I was here. Not all career paths have this luxury, but if you’re able to swing freelancing, contract gigs or remote work just to get you there, it’s an option. It also aligns you to meet with potential employers in real life and put yourself on their radar.

–EMILY BLOCH, BABE #201


Until Next Week,

—THE BWH ADVICE GURUS


Asking for a Friend is Babes Who Hustle's weekly advice column that asks and answers the work-related questions on all of our minds. Looking for advice and guidance? Hit us with all of your questions below and stay tuned for next Wednesday's edition!

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BABE #264: GARIELE WRIGHT - Founder, Rad Girls Collective

BABE #264: GARIELE WRIGHT - Founder, Rad Girls Collective

BABE #263: THEA MULLIS - Travel Director, Summit Camp

BABE #263: THEA MULLIS - Travel Director, Summit Camp