#babeswhohustle

“In the future, there will be no female leaders. There will just be leaders.” 
― Sheryl Sandberg

Asking For a Friend | Chapter 57

Asking For a Friend | Chapter 57

Advice from Babe to Babe


Interviewing is nervewracking, no matter how many “so tell us about yourself” answers you have under your belt. This week, the BWH advice gurus are here to help you through all the salary Qs and offer letter conundrums you may have.


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I own a small company and think you can ask. However, it depends on how much the company needs someone. They may be willing to give you a week, but probably not much more. I would also not say it is for other offers, but just tell them you want to consider their offer. Remember they can counter or say no, so be ready for that.
—Jessica Wright, BABE #205

Totally! If something doesn’t feel right, or you’re negotiating another offer, it’s always OK to ask for more time. I wouldn’t ask for longer than a week beyond what they give you, but the worst they can do is say no. And don’t hesitate to let the other company (or companies) know you’re sitting on an offer and for how much—sometimes that’s all a recruiting team needs to kick things into high gear! I talk about how I sat on one great offer while waiting for the right offer in my last article here: Why I Took a Job That Paid Less (And Why I'd Do It Again).
—Mandy Shold, BABE #154 + Contributor


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If you get another interview, ask then. Be forward and just ask. If they’re really interested in you, they should expect that question.
—Jessica Wright, BABE #205

Be bold, babe! Tell them the range you’re looking for and see if what they offer fits within your goals. Just remember it’s usually the recruiters and HR folks who know what they’re able to offer, not necessarily the team you’re interviewing with.
—Mandy Shold, BABE #154 + Contributor

It’s not only totally reasonable for you to do so, but it’s also the best plan of action for everyone involved. Why waste your time—and the time of the hiring manager(s)—if the salary they’re looking to provide is a deal-breaker? It’s totally OK to send them a quick note asking for the range they’re offering so you can be on the same page moving forward.
—Chelsea DuDeVoire, Founder + CEO


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Ask for time to be able to make a decision, and ask additional questions if you have them. If someone offers you a job on the spot, it’s in your best interest to give yourself some wiggle room to make an informed decision. If it’s offered, say something along the lines of: “Thank you for your offer. I’d like some time to review what we’ve discussed so far and continue the conversation. What is your timeline?”
—Diana Morris, BABE #182

I agree with Diana. Even if they do offer you a job on the spot, they should allow you to consider. You need to take a breath and make sure you’re doing what’s in your best interest.
—Jessica Wright, BABE #205

Good things to know before accepting an offer are salary, standard benefits and supplemental benefits like work-from-home policies. It's also good to know what the culture of your team will be and the reporting structure. Diving deep into your day-to-day both from a job responsibilities perspective as well as a team/culture perspective are important in a second interview.
—Krystina Wales, Contributor

It's always acceptable to ask for time to decide, but I would be fair to your potential employer. Chances are that they need you and would like to get you working quickly, so asking for a couple of days is reasonable. Also, while I generally think transparency is the best plan, in this case, I would advise discretion. Telling your potential employer you're waiting on other offers can be fairly offensive to them and can potentially cause them to rescind their offer because they perceive you as not as interested. (It's like telling a potential date you're going to wait to see if you get a better offer for Friday night.) I would advise saying you'd like a few days to review the contract and your finances, discuss with a significant other, etc.
—Amanda Handley, Contributor


Until Next Week,

—THE BWH ADVICE GURUS


Asking for a Friend is Babes Who Hustle's weekly advice column that asks and answers the work-related questions on all of our minds. Looking for advice and guidance? Hit us with all of your questions below and stay tuned for next Wednesday's edition!


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