#babeswhohustle

“In the future, there will be no female leaders. There will just be leaders.” 
― Sheryl Sandberg

Asking For a Friend | Chapter 48

Asking For a Friend | Chapter 48

Advice from Babe to Babe


Age is just a construct, but sometimes it can create awkward situations in the workplace. This week, the BWH advice gurus walk you through how to handle yourself, your goals, and your Instagram in the young stages of your career.


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As hard as it might be in the moment, shut down those comments right away. Something as simple as “I don’t think that’s appropriate,” or “My age isn’t relevant to your interview,” should let them know that they f*cked up, and should not be acting that way. Your position behind the desk and the experience that got you there are the only things that should matter to an interviewee.

–MARA STROBEL-LANKA, BWH CREATIVE DIRECTOR

I’ve been in a similar situation, and something that helped to draw the line was to act as professional as possible. I tried to remind myself as an internship supervisor to act more as a professional than a friend. In the interview process, it’s tougher of course when going off of first impressions. If you show confidence in your abilities and they still don’t believe you are credible enough with your age, that’s their issue because they are missing out on an incredible opportunity. Don’t dwell on the naysayers– there are plenty of people out there that will trust and appreciate your expertise.

–MORGAN PURVIS, BWH INTERN


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1) Write your vision for your life in five years in the form of a typical day. What do you do first when you wake up? Where do you go? What kind of tasks do you do? Who do you see? Etc. all the way until bedtime.

2) Take that vision and create a list of trackable goals covering a variety of categories like wellness, career, and relationships.

3) Come backward for each, asking yourself "If I am to hit this goal in 5 years, where would I need to be in 3? In 1? What can I do this week?”

4) In the end, you should have a vision that excites you and a list of steps to get there!

–KIMBERLY NOVOSEL, BABE #18

When I'm trying to plan I, find putting pen to paper really gets my mind jogging and producing thoughts. I usually start by jotting down any relevant idea (usually in bad handwriting, like the kind you can barely read yourself). Then after I have a framework, I rewrite everything neatly, usually in the order of how I want to progress. If I'm worried about losing the material or want it to be neater, I'll type it up. I rewrite because it causes my brain to fine-tune, clarify and update points if needed (kind of like a final draft).

After I have a clear goal, I break that goal down into the steps to get to it (I ask myself what I have to do to reach the goal). I always think SMART goals (specific, measurable, attainable, realistic and timely). Then my subgoals will be my checkpoints and I work to set reasonable timelines for them. I try not to have too many subgoals to avoid getting overwhelmed, or too little, which usually means I will have to do a lot to reach a goal. Small-to-medium victories are motivating. I keep this checklist somewhere visible to keep myself on track.

–DOMONIQUE KING JACKSON, BABE #198


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My only two firm rules for editing your own Instagram would be: 1) no nudity, and 2) no drugs (duh). Outside of that, your personal Instagram should be, well, personal. While different positions might require different levels of professionalism and privacy in and out of the office, all of them should give you room to be a person who does normal person things like post a happy hour selfie or wear a bikini to the beach. If your profile is public, you’re probably already aware that anyone and everyone has access to what you choose to share. Be a good person on the internet, and let your personality shine through– your Instagram could give employers a 3-D look at what makes you special outside of your 2-D resume.

–MARA STROBEL-LANKA, BWH CREATIVE DIRECTOR

I could be wrong, but it sounds like you’re applying for marketing roles if they’re asking for personal Instagram handles. Use this as an opportunity to show off your marketing skills! Many employers want to see how you showcase yourself. It varies by company, but most do not mind the occasional alcohol picture — as long as you’re not showcasing yourself as someone who will come into work with a frequent hangover. One tip would be to check out what other employees at the company post, and follow those guidelines. If all else fails, you can stick to the rule that if you wouldn’t show it to your grandma, you shouldn't show it to a potential employer.

–MORGAN PURVIS, BWH INTERN


Until Next Week,

—THE BWH ADVICE GURUS


Asking for a Friend is Babes Who Hustle's weekly advice column that asks and answers the work-related questions on all of our minds. Looking for advice and guidance? Hit us with all of your questions below and stay tuned for next Wednesday's edition!


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Name
ex: "xoxo Gossip Girl"
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BABE #293: CHRIS FIELD - Founder, Studio Physique

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BABE #292: DINA DEMARCO - Division President, Emerging Businesses - Hueman